Awards

Our Annual Award winners are announced each year at this event. You can also view our archive of previous Award Recipients.

CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal Award

The CRSS Gold Medal Award was introduced in 1986 to recognise either a significant new advance in remote sensing research, development, technology or applications, or a significant long-term contribution to the field of remote sensing in Canada. In 2013, the CRSS Gold Medal was renamed the CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal in honour of Dr. Lawrence W. Morley (February 19, 1920 – April 22, 2013), the founding Director General of the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing and first President of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society. The Larry Morley Gold Medal is the highest award in the country granted by the Canadian Remote Sensing Society for excellence in remote sensing.

Nomination Process
The candidate must be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS who have not worked for or with the nominee in a substantive manner during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/ resumé). Nominees who have received the CRSS Bronze Medal or CRSS Silver Medal in the last five years are not eligible. Nominations must be received by the CRSS Vice-President by the due date indicated above, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The CRSS Executive will review the nominations that are brought forward by the Vice-President.

Val Shaw Memorial Award

The Val Shaw Memorial Award was established in 1990 in memory of Valerie Shaw, an executive with the Bercha Group and a strong proponent of remote sensing in Canada. The award consists of a certificate that recognizes lifelong achievement in practical remote sensing applied to natural resource management.
Val Shaw was a Vice-President of one of the most successful companies active in remote sensing in Canada in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s and was one of the early leaders in the field. While a worthy competitor in business, she was known for her honesty, dedication to client service, and the fact that she gave generously of her time to students, colleagues, and the many people she touched. Relatively early in life she was suddenly struck down by a virulent form of leukemia. She left four children, who attended the first presentation of the award named in her honour to Dr. Al Gregory at the 14th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing in Calgary in 1991.

Nomination Process
The candidate must be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS who have not worked for or with the nominee in a substantive manner during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/ resumé). Nominations must be received by the CRSS Vice-President by the due date indicated above, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The CRSS Executive will review the nominations that are brought forward by the Vice-President.

CRSS Silver Medal Award

The CRSS Silver Medal Award was established in 2009 as a mid-career achievement award to recognise excellence in remote sensing in Canada. Nominations are invited for outstanding candidates from any sector (e.g. industry, government, university) who have made important and sustained contributions to remote sensing in Canada, typically for a period of more than 10 years.

Nomination Process
The candidate must be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS who have not worked for or with the nominee in a substantive manner during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions to date. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/resumé). Nominees who have received the CRSS Bronze Medal in the last five years are not eligible. Nominations must be received by the CRSS Vice-President by the due date indicated above, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The CRSS Executive will review the nominations that are brought forward by the Vice-President.

CRSS Bronze Medal Award

The CRSS Bronze Medal Award was established in 2009 as an early-career achievement award to recognise emerging excellence in remote sensing in Canada. Nominations are invited for outstanding candidates from any sector (e.g. industry, government, university) who are 40 years of age or less, as of December 31 of the year of the Award.

Nomination Process
The candidate must be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS who have not worked for or with the nominee in a substantive manner during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions to date, and future potential. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/resumé). Nominations must be received by the CRSS Vice-President by the due date indicated above, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The CRSS Executive will review the nominations that are brought forward by the Vice-President.

Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Best Paper Award

The CJRS Prize Paper Award was created in 2001 to recognise excellence in peer-reviewed publications. The award will be presented during the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing for the best paper (published in any category) in the prior year’s volume. The CJRS Editorial Board, based upon nominations from reviewers, board members, or CRSS members, recommends the winner to the CRSS Awards Committee. The winner will receive a one-year membership in CRSS and a certificate.

National Best Master’s Thesis and Best Ph.D. Thesis

The CRSS may issue Student Awards for the best theses at the Master’s and Ph.D. levels. The recipients of these Awards will receive a Certificate and will be invited to present the results of their thesis at the following Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing. Symposium registration will be complimentary.

Eligibility
The candidate must have been a student at a Canadian university for their graduate studies. The candidate must have successfully defended their thesis and submitted it in final form to their university. The year of eligibility for a given thesis is determined by the year of copyright © printed on the title page of the final (bound) thesis. The current competition is open to theses with the copyright year in the previous full calendar year before the deadline [i.e. Jan 1 – Dec. 31 of the year preceding the awards submission deadline].

Nomination process
The nomination must be made in writing by the thesis supervisor or Department Head/Chair. Only one thesis, per department or administrative unit, in each of the post-graduate levels, will be considered, with any internal selections being the responsibility of the department/unit concerned. The nomination must explain the merit of the work and must include the final thesis as a digital .PDF file (identical to the hardbound thesis), including title page with copyright © year and any approval signatures. Nominations must be received by the Vice-President of CRSS by the due date indicated above, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others.

CRSS Student Symposium Travel Grants
(3 awards available: $1000.00 each)

Up to three (3) CRSS Symposium Travel Grants of $1000 each are available to students (B.Sc., M.Sc. or Ph.D. level) enrolled at a Canadian university or college to attend the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing.

Eligibility
You must be a member in good standing of CRSS at the time of application. You must have an accepted abstract for the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing. You must provide a budget outlining commitments for the additional funds to attend the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing.

Application
You must complete and submit a Student Application for Conference Travel Reimbursement form to Dr. Anne Smith anne.smith@agr.gc.ca on or before April 30. The quality of the abstracts and Travel Grant Applications will be evaluated by the Awards committee.
Download the Application Form

CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal Award

Note: Affiliations at time of award

  • 2016 – Dr. Joseph Buckley, Royal Military College
  • 2013 – Dr. Paris W. Vachon, Defence Research and Development Canada
  • 2012 – Dr. Robert Ryerson, Kim Geomatics Corporation
  • 2011 – Dr. Vern Singhroy, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 2010 – Dr. Karl Staenz, University of Lethbridge
  • 2009 – Dr. Donald G. Leckie, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service
  • 2008 – Dr. A. Laurence Gray, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 2007 – Dr. Steven E. Franklin, University of Saskatchewan
  • 2006 – Dr. Philippe M. Teillet, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 2005 – Dr. Ellsworth F. LeDrew, University of Waterloo
  • 2004 – Dr. David Goodenough, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service
  • 2002 – Dr. Josef Cihlar, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 2001 – Dr. Ferdinand Bonn, Université de Sherbrooke
  • 2000 – Dr. James F.R. Gower, Institute for Ocean Sciences
  • 1999 – Dr. R. Keith Raney, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory
  • 1997 – Dr. Edryd Shaw, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 1996 – Dr. John R. Miller, York University
  • 1993 – Dr. Philip J. Howarth, University of Waterloo
  • 1991 – Dr. Frank J. Ahern, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 1989 – Dr. John S. MacDonald, MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.
  • 1987 – Mr. E.A. Godby, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
  • 1986 – Dr. L.W. Morley, Institute for Space and Terrestrial Science
Val Shaw Memorial Award
  • 2015 – Dr. Ron Hall, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
  • 2007 – Dr. Francis J. Ahern, TerreVista Earth Imaging
  • 2001 – Mr. Jean Beaubien, Service canadien des forêts
  • 1996 – Dr. Peter Murtha, University of British Columbia
  • 1991 – Dr. Al Gregory, Gregory Geoscience
CRSS Silver Medal Award
  • 2016 – Dr. Derek Peddle, University of Lethbridge
  • 2010 – Dr. Michael A. Wulder, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service
CRSS Bronze Medal Award
  • 2015 – Dr. Laura Chasmer, University of Lethbridge
  • 2012 – Dr. Quazi K. Hassan, University of Calgary
  • 2011 – Dr. Ahmed Shaker, Ryerson University
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Best Paper Award
  • 2016 – V. Singhroy, J. Li and F. Charbonneau (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing) for their paper entitled: “High resolution rapid revisits InSAR monitoring of surface deformation” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 41(5): 458-472.
  • 2015 – Douglas PiZ, Murray Woods, and Margaret Penner (from the Canadian Forest Service, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and Forest Analysis Ltd. respecRvely) for their paper enUtled: “A comparison of point clouds derived from stereo imagery and airborne laser scanning for the area-based esUmaUon of forest inventory aRributes in boreal Ontario.” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 40, No. 3 pp. 214-232.
  • 2012 – A.P. Trishcenko (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, ON) and co-authors for “a discussion of issues associated with the development of a satellite system with a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) for Artic observation”, as published in:
    A. P. Trishcenko and L. Garand 2012. Observing Polar Regions from Space: Advantages of a Satellite System on a Highly Elliptical Orbit versus a Constellation of Low Earth Polar Orbiters. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 38(1) pp.12-24.
  • 2011 – A.M. Smith (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB) and co-authors for “an important contribution to RADARSAT-2 image analysis of native grasslands in western Canada”, as published in:
    A.M. Smith and J.R. Buckley, 2011. Investigating RADARSAT-2 as a tool for monitoring grassland in western Canada. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 37(1), pp. 93-102.
  • 2010 – A.I. Calderhead (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology) and co-authors, for the application of differential interferometry “ to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images (D-InSAR) of the Toluca Valley, Mexico, with the aim of measuring and monitoring land subsidence” as published in:
    A.I. Calderhead, R. Martel, P.-J. Alasset, A. Rivera, and J. Garfias. 2010. Land subsidence induced by groundwater pumping, monitored by D-InSAR and field data in the Toluca Valley, Mexico. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 36 (1), pp. 9-23
  • 2009 – J. Whitcomb (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI) and co-authors, for the development of a wetland mapping tool integrating JERS-1 imagery for “improved characterization of land-atmosphere CH4 and CO2 fluxes and climatic change impacts associated with thawing soils and changes in the extent and drying of wetland ecosystems” as published in:
    J. Whitcomb, M. Moghaddam, K.McDonald, J. Kellndorfer, and E. Podest. 2009. Mapping vegetated wetlands of Alaska using L-band radar satellite imagery. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 35 (1), pp. 54-72
  • 2008 – M.A. Wulder (Pacific Forestry Centre, Victoria, BC) and co-authors, for “the design, development and implementation of a first-ever Landsat classification of the forested area of Canada“, as published in
    M. A. Wulder, J. C. White, M. Cranny, R. J. Hall, J. E. Luther, A. Beaudoin, D. G. Goodenough, and J. A. Dechka. 2008. Monitoring Canada’s Forests. Part 1: Completion of the EOSD Land Cover Project. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 34 (6), pp. 549-562.
  • 2007 – J.C.B. Da Silva (Universidade de Lisboa, Lison, Portugal) and co-authors, for “a unique use of SAR imagery for ocean remote sensing”, as published in:
    J.C.B. Da Silva, A.L. New and A. Azevedo, 2007. On the role of SAR for observing “local generation” of internal solitary waves off the Iberian Peninsula. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 33 (5):388-403.
  • 2006 – Darren Janzen (University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, B.C.) and co-authors, for “an innovative approach to forestry remote sensing image processing and analysis”, as published in:
    Janzen, D., R. Wheate and A. Fredeen, 2006. Radiometric Correction Techniques and Accuracy Assessment for Landsat TM data in Remote Forested Regions, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 32(5): 330-340.
  • 2005 – Naomi H. Short (Noetix Research Inc., Ottawa) and co-authors, for “an important contribution to RADARSAT image analysis of glacier movement in northern Canada”, as published in:
    Short, N.H. and A.L. Gray, 2005. Glacier Dynamics in the Canadian High Arctic from RADARSAT-1 Speckle Tracking. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 31(3):225-239.
  • 2002 – A. Laurence Gray (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa) and co-authors, for “a critical assessment of the application of SAR interferometry as an original quantitative SAR interpretation technique to an important and generalised problem” as published in:
    Gray, A.L., Short, N., Mattar, K.E., and Jezek, K.C., 2001. Velocities and Flux of the Filchner Ice shelf and its Tributaries Determined from Speckle Tracking Interferometry, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 27(3): 193-206.
  • 2001 – Sverre T. Dokken (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) and co-authors, for a “significant contribution to the development and validation of sea ice remote sensing applications” as published in:
    Dokken, S.T., B. Håkansson and J. Askne, 2000. Inter-Comparison of Arctic Sea Ice Concentration Using RADARSAT, ERS, SSM/I and In-Situ Data, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 26(6): 521-536.
National Best Master’s Thesis
  • 2016 – Charles Papasodoro (U. Sherbrooke, co-supervisors: A. Royer and A. Langlois) entitled “Utilisation de la stereo radargrammétrie RADARSAT-2 pour le suivi de la fonte des calottes glaciaires Barnes et Penny (île de Baffin)”.
  • 2015 – Vanessa Mascorro, Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia, for her thesis entitled “Assessing forest disturbances for carbon modeling: building the bridge between activity data and carbon budget modeling”.
  • 2012 – Christopher Czerwinski, “Forest change detection and mapping in Gatineau Park, Québec 1987 to 2010 using Landsat imagery”. Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University (Drs. Scott Mitchell and Doug King, Co-Supervisors).
  • 2011 (tie) -Thomas Bergeron, “Estimation de la ressource éolienne en mer à l’aide du satellite RADARSAT-2”. Centre Eau Terre et Environment, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université du Québec. (Monique Bernier Supervisor)
  • 2011 (tie) – Cheryl Rogers, “Remote Sensing of Light Use Efficiency in a Boreal Forest and Peatland in James Bay, Quebec”. Department of Natural Resources, McGill University. (Margaret Kalacska, Supervisor)
  • 2010 – Yuanming Shu, “Dark Spot Detection from SAR Intensity Imagery with Spatial Density Thresholding for Oil Spill Monitoring.” Department of Geography, University of Waterloo. (Jonathan Li, Supervisor)
  • 2009 – Thoreau Rory Tooke, “Remote Sensing Applications for Vegetation Management in Urban Environments”, Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)
  • 2008 – Christopher Bater “Assessing indicators of forest sustainability using LIDAR remote sensing”, Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)
  • 2007 (tie) – David Alfred, ” Semi-automated rooftop identification from high spatial and spectral resolution spaceborne remote sensing imagery”, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario (Jinfei Wang, Supervisor)
  • 2007 (tie) – Peter Eddy, ” Development of remote sensing techniques for the implementation of site specific herbicide management “, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Anne Smith and Derek Peddle, Supervisors).
  • 2006 – Scott A. Soenen, “Remote Sensing of Montane Forest Structure and Biomass: A Canopy Reflectance Model Inversion Approach”, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).
  • 2005 – Jonathon Pasher, “Modelling and Mapping Potential Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia Citrina) Habitat Using Remote Sensing”, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University (Doug King and Kathryn Lindsay, Supervisors)
  • 2003 – Nicole J. Rabe, “Remote Sensing of Crop Biophysical Parameters for Site-Specific Agriculture.”, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).
  • 2002 – Catherine M. Champagne, “Remote Sensing of Plant Water Content for Precision Agriculture: The Potential for Hyperspectral Modelling.”, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa (Abdou Bannari and Karl Staenz, Supervisors).
  • 2001 – Alice Deschamps, “Characterization of Modern Reefs using the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA) Protocol and Digitized aerial photographs, Tobago Cays Marine Park, St. Vincent and the Grenadines”, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa (André Desrochers, Supervisor).
  • 2000 – Ryan L. Johnson, “Airborne Remote Sensing of Forest Leaf Area in Mountainous Terrain, Kananaskis Alberta”, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).
  • 1999 – Kris Innanen, “Approaches to the Direct Extraction of Forest Canopy Variables from High-Spatial Resolution Winter Reflectance Imagery”, Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 1997 – Mike Wulder, “Airborne Remote Sensing of Forest Structure: Estimation of Leaf Area Index”, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Ellsworth LeDrew, Supervisor).
  • 1995 – Ray Soffer, “Bidirectional Reflectance Factors of an Open Tree Canopy by Laboratory Simulation”, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 1990 – Richard Fournier, “3-Dimensional Modelling of Forest Canopies for High Resolution Imagery”, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 1989 – Joan E. Luther, “Terrain Classification using Landsat Thematic Mapper and Digital Topographic Data in the Burwash Uplands, Southwest Yukon”, Department of Geography, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Steven Franklin, Supervisor).
National Best Ph.D. Thesis
  • 2016 (tie) – Karin van Ewijk “Estimating forest structure from LIDAR and high spatial resolution imagery for the prediction of succession and species composition.” Queen’s University. (Supervisors: N. Scott and P. Treitz)
  • 2016 (tie) Serge Olivier Kotchi “Estimation et évaluation d’incertitude d’indicateurs agrométéorologiques par télédétection en vue de supporter la lutte phytosanitaire.” Laval University. (Supervisor: Nathalie Barrette)
  • 2015 – Alexandre Roy, Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke, for his thesis entitled “Modélisation de l’émission micro-onde hivernale en forêt boréale canadienne.”
  • 2012 – Martin Béland, “Estimation de paramètres structuraux des arbres dans une savane à partir de mesures LiDAR terrestre et d’imagerie à très haute résolution spatiale”. Département de Géomatique Appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke. (Richard Fournier, Supervisor)
  • 2011 (tie) – Gang Chen, “A GEOBIA Framework for Estimating Forest Biophysical Parameters: Integrating Lidar Transects and Quickbird Data”. Department of Geography, University of Calgary. (Geoffrey Hay, Supervisor)
  • 2011 (tie) – Trevor Gareth Jones, “Employing Advanced Airborne Remotely Sensed Data to Improve Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping”. Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia. (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)
  • 2010 – Julia Linke, “Development and Application of a Framework for Flexible and Reliable Landscape Monitoring: Changes in the Alberta Foothills and the Impact on Grizzly Bear Habitat”. Department of Geography, University of Calgary (Greg McDermid, Supervisor).
  • 2009 – Inian Moorthy, “Tree Crown Structural Characterization: A Study Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and 3D Radiative Transfer Modeling”, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 2008 (tie) – Thomas Hilker, “Estimation of photosynthetic light-use efficiency from automated multi-angular spectroradiometer measurements of Coastal Douglas-Fir” Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)
  • 2008 (tie) – Laura Chasmer, “Canopy structural and meteorological influences on CO2 exchange for MODIS product validation in a Boreal Jack Pine chronosequence”, Department of Geography Queen University (Harry McCaughey and Paul Treitz, Supervisors)
  • 2007 – Yongqin (Lisa) Zhang, “Hyperspectral remote sensing algorithms for retrieving forest chlorophyll content”, Department of Geography, University of Toronto (Jing Chen, Supervisor)
  • 2006 – Valerie A. Thomas, “Spatially explicit modelling of forest structure and function using airborne lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data combined with micrometeorological measurements”, Department of Geography, Queen’s University (Paul Treitz and Harry McCaughey, Supervisors)
  • 2005 – Arnaud Mialon, “Étude de la variabilité climatique des hautes latitudes nord, dérivée d’observations satellites micro-ondes” , Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke (Alain Royer Université de Sherbrooke et Michel Fily, Université Josef Fourier, Grenoble France, Supervisors)
  • 2002 – Robin Qiaofeng Zhang, “Spatial, Spectral and Temporal Analysis of Urban Landscape Dynamics Using Optical Satellite Data”, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario (Jinfei Wang, Supervisor).
  • 2001 – Pablo J. Zarco-Tejada, “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Closed Forest Canopies: Estimation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Pigment Content”, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 2000 – H. Peter White, “Investigations of Boreal Forest Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF)”, Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).
  • 1997 – Derek R. Peddle, “Remote Sensing of Boreal Forest Terrain: Sub-Pixel Modeling of Land Cover and Biophysical Parameters at Forest Stand and Regional Scales”, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Ellsworth LeDrew, Supervisor).
  • 1992 – Grant A. Bracher, “Detection of Nutrient Stress in Douglas-Fir Seedlings using Spectroradiometer Data”, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia (Peter A. Murtha, Supervisor).
  • 1989 – Jinfei Wang, “A new automated Linear-feature Network Detection and Analysis (LINDA) System and its applications”, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Phil Howarth, Supervisor).