Awards

Our Annual Award winners are announced each year at this event. You can also view our archive of previous Award Recipients.

Awards

CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal Award

The CRSS Gold Medal Award was introduced in 1986 to recognise either a significant new advance in remote sensing research, development, technology or applications, or a significant long-term contribution to the field of remote sensing in Canada. In 2013, the CRSS Gold Medal was renamed the CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal in honour of Dr. Lawrence W. Morley (February 19, 1920 – April 22, 2013), the founding Director General of the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing and first President of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society. The Larry Morley Gold Medal is the highest award in the country granted by the Canadian Remote Sensing Society for excellence in remote sensing.

Nomination Process

The candidate must be a member in good standing of the CRSS for a minimum of eight (8) years and be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of the CRSS. The members and the nominee cannot be employees of the same organization during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions. Service to the CRSS will be considered to be an asset. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/ resume). Nominees who have received the CRSS Bronze Medal or CRSS Silver Medal in the last five years are not eligible. Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The nominations will be reviewed by the CRSS Awards Committee.

Val Shaw Memorial Award

The Val Shaw Memorial Award was established in 1990 in memory of Valerie Shaw, an executive with the Bercha Group and a strong proponent of remote sensing in Canada. The award consists of a certificate that recognizes lifelong achievement in practical remote sensing applied to natural resource management.
Val Shaw was a Vice-President of one of the most successful companies active in remote sensing in Canada in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s and was one of the early leaders in the field. While a worthy competitor in business, she was known for her honesty, dedication to client service, and the fact that she gave generously of her time to students, colleagues, and the many people she touched. Relatively early in life she was suddenly struck down by a virulent form of leukemia. She left four children, who attended the first presentation of the award named in her honour to Dr. Al Gregory at the 14th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing in Calgary in 1991.

Nomination Process

The candidate must be a member in good standing of the CRSS for a minimum of five (5) years and be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS. The members and the nominee cannot be employees of the same organization during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions. Service to the CRSS will be considered to be an asset. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/ resume). Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The nominations will be reviewed by the CRSS Awards Committee.

CRSS Silver Medal Award

The CRSS Silver Medal Award was established in 2009 as a mid-career achievement award to recognise excellence in remote sensing in Canada. Nominations are invited for outstanding candidates from any sector (e.g. industry, government, university) who have made important and sustained contributions to remote sensing in Canada, typically for a period of more than 10 years.

Nomination Process

The candidate must be a member in good standing of the CRSS for a minimum of five (5) years and be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS. The members and the nominee cannot be employees of the same organization during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions to date. Service to the CRSS will be considered to be an asset. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/resume). Nominees who have received the CRSS Bronze Medal in the last five years are not eligible. Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The nominations will be reviewed by the CRSS Awards Committee.

CRSS Bronze Medal Award

The CRSS Bronze Medal Award was established in 2009 as an early-career achievement award to recognise emerging excellence in remote sensing in Canada. Nominations are invited for outstanding candidates from any sector (e.g. industry, government, university) who are 40 years of age or less, as of December 31 of the year of the Award.

Nomination Process

The candidate must be a member in good standing of the CRSS for a minimum of three (3) years and be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of CRSS. The members and the nominee cannot be employees of the same organization during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions to date, and future potential. Service to the CRSS will be considered to be an asset. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/resume). Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The nominations will be reviewed by the CRSS Awards Committee.

Outstanding Service Award

The CRSS Outstanding Service Award was developed to recognize a significant long-term service to the Canadian Remote Sensing Society. The award consists of a certificate that recognizes the long term contributions of the recipient.

Nomination Process

The candidate must be a member of the CRSS and be nominated in writing by two members in good standing of the CRSS who have not worked for or with the nominee in a substantive manner during the previous three years. The nomination should clearly describe the candidate’s contributions and service to the CRSS and our community. Additional letters of support and other supporting documentation would help to strengthen the nomination (e.g. curriculum vitae/ resumé). Nominees who have received the Larry Morley Gold Medal are not eligible. Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below, and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. The nominations will be reviewed by the CRSS Awards Committee.

Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Best Paper Award

The CJRS Prize Paper Award was created in 2001 to recognise excellence in peer-reviewed publications. The award will be presented during the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing for the best paper (published in any category) in the prior year’s volume. The CJRS Editorial Board, based upon nominations from reviewers, board members, or CRSS members, recommends the winner to the CRSS Awards Committee. The winner will receive a one-year membership in CRSS and a certificate.

View Application Instruction for All Award Submissions/Nominations

Deadline

All materials associated with nominations for awards must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) with cc to the CRSS-SCT Executive Assistant by the end of the business day on February 23, 2022.

CRSS-SCT Award Nomination Form

Format

All materials should be submitted by e-mail as digital file attachments, preferably in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (.PDF). Other acceptable formats include Rich Text Format (.RTF) and Microsoft Word (.DOC). Official letters of support must be signed and ideally be on the company/institutional letterhead. Hardcopy materials should be digitized/scanned to a digital file. Multiple files for a given nominee should be saved into one archive file (e.g. .ZIP).

Further instructions for specific awards are listed below.

Chair, CRSS-SCT WG4 (Award and Fellows)– awards@crss-sct.ca

with cc to the CRSS-SCT Executive Assistant admin@crss-sct.ca

If it is impossible to submit a document in digital form, hard copy materials may be sent to the address below.

Student Awards

National Best Master’s Thesis and Best Ph.D. Thesis

The Canadian Remote Sensing Society issue a Student Award for the best thesis at the Master’s level and the best thesis at the Ph.D. level. The recipients of these Awards will receive a certificate and will be invited to present the results of their thesis at the following Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing. He/she will receive $1000 from CRSS-SCT to support their travel to the symposium. Symposium registration will be complimentary.

Eligibility

The candidate must be a member in good standing of CRSS and must have been a student at a Canadian university for their graduate studies. The candidate must have successfully defended their thesis and submitted it in final form to their university. The year of eligibility for a given thesis is determined by the year of copyright © printed on the title page of the final (bound) thesis. The current competition is open to theses with the copyright year in the previous full calendar year before the deadline (i.e. Jan 1 – Dec. 31 of the year preceding the deadline).

Nomination process

The nomination must be made in writing by the thesis supervisor or Department Head/Chair. Only one thesis, per department or administrative unit, in each of the postgraduate levels, will be considered, with any internal selections being the responsibility of the department/unit concerned. The nomination must explain the merit of the work and must include the final thesis as a digital .PDF file (identical to the hardbound thesis), including title page with copyright © year and any approval signatures. Nominations must be received by the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) by the due date indicated below and are to remain confidential from the nominee and others. All the submitted theses will be evaluated by an expert committee (one for the PhD theses and one for the MSc theses) who will use the following criteria,

  1. Supporting letter(s).
  2. Dissemination of the knowledge from the thesis.
  3. Relevancy of the work.
  4. Novelty of the research.
  5. Quality of the research.
  6. Quality of the thesis.

Note: It is the thesis that is evaluated, not the CV of the nominee.

CRSS Student Symposium Travel Grants

Up to three (3) CRSS Symposium Travel Grants of $1000 each are available to students (B.Sc., M.Sc. or Ph.D. level) enrolled at a Canadian university or college to attend the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing.

Eligibility

The student must be a member in good standing of CRSS at the time of application.
The student must be the lead (first) author on an abstract which has been accepted for presentation at the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing.
The student must provide a letter of a maximum of 1000 words explaining the student’s contribution to the work described in the abstract, detailing its originality, and providing details on what he/she expects to gain from attending the symposium.
The student’s supervisor must provide a letter of support explaining the merit of the work described in the abstract.
The student must complete and submit a Student Application for Conference Travel Reimbursement form that includes a budget outlining commitment for the additional funds to attend the Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing. It can be downloaded from the CRSS-SCT website.
All documentation is to be sent to the Chair of Working Group 4 (CRSS Awards and Fellows) no later than April 1st, 2022.

The quality of the abstracts and travel grant applications will be evaluated by the CRSS Awards committee.

Previous Award Winners

CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal Award

Note: Affiliations at time of award

2021 – Dr. Michael Wulder, Canadian Forest Service
2020 – Dr. Nicolas Coops, University of British Columbia
2019 – Dr. Monique Bernier, INRS & CJRS Editor in Chief (Article was published and shared on social networks of the INRS – French only)
2018 – Dr. Charles Livingstone, Defence Research and Development Canada
2017 – Dr. Brian Brisco, Natural Resources Canada
2016 – Dr. Joseph Buckley, Royal Military College
2014 – Dr. K. Olaf Niemann, University of Victoria
2013 – Dr. Paris W. Vachon, Defence Research and Development Canada
2012 – Dr. Robert Ryerson, Kim Geomatics Corporation
2011 – Dr. Vern Singhroy, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
2010 – Dr. Karl Staenz, University of Lethbridge
2009 – Dr. Donald G. Leckie, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service
2008 – Dr. A. Laurence Gray, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
2007 – Dr. Steven E. Franklin, University of Saskatchewan
2006 – Dr. Philippe M. Teillet, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
2005 – Dr. Ellsworth F. LeDrew, University of Waterloo
2004 – Dr. David Goodenough, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service
2002 – Dr. Josef Cihlar, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
2001 – Dr. Ferdinand Bonn, Université de Sherbrooke
2000 – Dr. James F.R. Gower, Institute for Ocean Sciences
1999 – Dr. R. Keith Raney, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory
1997 – Dr. Edryd Shaw, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
1996 – Dr. John R. Miller, York University
1993 – Dr. Philip J. Howarth, University of Waterloo
1991 – Dr. Frank J. Ahern, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
1989 – Dr. John S. MacDonald, MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.
1987 – Mr. E.A. Godby, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
1986 – Dr. L.W. Morley, Institute for Space and Terrestrial Science

Val Shaw Memorial Award

2020 – Claire Gosselin, Effigis Geo-Solutions Inc
2019 – Dr. Gary Borstad, ASL Environmental Sciences
2018 – Dirk Werle, ÆRDE Environmental Research
2017 – Dr. Jeff R. Harris, Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa
2015 – Dr. Ron Hall, Canadian Forest Service, Edmonton
2007 – Dr. Francis J. Ahern, TerreVista Earth Imaging, Ottawa
2001 – Mr. Jean Beaubien, Service canadien des forêts, Quebec
1996 – Dr. Peter Murtha, University of British Columbia
1991 – Dr. Al Gregory, Gregory Geoscience

CRSS Silver Medal Award

2018 – Prof. Dr. Margaret Kalacska, McGill University
2017 – Dr. Josée Lévesque, DND, Defence Research and Development Canada, Valcartier
2016 – Dr. Derek Peddle, University of Lethbridge
2014 – Dr. Nicholas C. Coops, University of British Columbia
2010 – Dr. Michael A. Wulder, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Victoria

CRSS Bronze Medal Award

2020 -Dr. Wai Yeung Yan, Ryerson University & Hong Kong Polytechnic University (HKPolyU)
2019 – Dr. Bahram Salehi, SUNY College of Environmental Resources Engineering
2017 – Dr. Alexandre Langlois, University of Sherbrooke
2015 – Dr. Laura Chasmer, University of Lethbridge
2012 – Dr. Quazi K. Hassan, University of Calgary
2011 – Dr. Ahmed Shaker, Ryerson University

Outstanding Service Award

2021 – Dr. Anne Smith, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
2020 – Gordon Staples, MDA
2019 – Prof. Dr. Joseph Piwowar, University of Regina

Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Best Paper Award

2020

  • The first best paper award: Wesley Van Wychen, David Burgess, Will Kochtitzky, Natalija Nikolic, Luke Copland & Laurence Gray University of Waterloo for their paper entitled “RADARSAT-2 Derived Glacier Velocities and Dynamic Discharge Estimates for the Canadian High Arctic: 2015–2020” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, Volume 46(6)
  • The second best paper award: Guy E. I. Strickland, Joan E. Luther, Joanne C. White & Michael A. Wulder, Canadian Forest Service for their paper entitled “Extending Estimates of Tree and Tree Species Presence-Absence through Space and Time Using Landsat Composites” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 46(5)

2019 –

  • The first best paper award: Nassar, Ray (Env. Canada) + 32 co-authors for their paper entitled “The Atmospheric Imaging Mission for Northern Regions: AIM-North” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, Volume 45 (3-4) 423-442 – 1192 views as June 23, Open Access, 4 CrossRef citations, 4 altimetrics
  • The second best paper award: Michael A. Merchant, Rebecca. K. Warren, Rebecca Edwards, James K. Kenyon (Ducks Unlimited Canada) for their paper entitled “An object-based assessment of multi-wavelength SAR, optical imagery and topographical datasets for operational wetland mapping in Boreal Yukon.” Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 45 (3-4) 308-332 – 242 views as June 23, 6 CrossRef citations.

2018 –

  • The first best paper award: Melanie Chabot, John Lindsay, Tracy Rowlandson & Aaron A. Berg for their paper entitled « Comparing the Use of Terrestrial LiDAR Scanners and Pin Profilers for Deriving Agricultural Roughness Statistics » Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 44 (2) 153-168
  • The second best paper award: Wesley Van Wychen, Luke Copland, Hester Jiskoot, Laurence Gray, Martin Sharp & David Burgess for their paper entitled « Surface Velocities of Glaciers in Western Canada from Speckle-Tracking of ALOS PALSAR and RADARSAT-2 data » Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 44 (1) 57-66

2017 –

  • The first best paper award: Zhaohua Chen, Jon Pasher, Jason Duffe. and Amir Behnamian for their paper entitled “Mapping arctic coastal ecosystems with high resolution optical satellite imagery using a hybrid classification approach. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 43(6), 513-527.
  • The second best paper award: Chen Shang, Paul Treitz, John Caspersen, Trevor Jones for their paper entitled “Estimating stem diameter distributions in a management context for a tolerant hardwood forest using ALS height and intensity data”. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing Volume 43(1), 79-94.

2016 –

  • The first best paper award: A Trishchenko, S. Leblanc, S. Wang, J. Li, C. Ungureanu, Y. Luo, K. Khlopenkov and F. Fontana for their paper as published in: A Trishchenko, S. Leblanc, S. Wang, J. Li, C. Ungureanu, Y. Luo, K. Khlopenkov and F. Fontana “Variations of annual minimum snow and ice extent over Canada and neighbouring landmass derived from MODIS 250m imagery for 2000-2014 period”. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 42 (3) pp. 214-242.
  • The second best paper award: to Joonghoon Shin; Hailemariam Temesgen; Jacob Strunk; Thomas Hilker for their paper entitled “Comparing modeling methods for predicting forest attributes using LiDAR metrics and ground measurements”. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 42 (6). 739-765.

2015

V. Singhroy, J. Li and F. Charbonneau from the Canadian Centre of Remote Sensing for their paper as published in: V. Singhroy, J. Li and F. Charbonneau, 2015. High resolution rapid revisits InSAR monitoring of surface deformation, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 41(5) pp. 458-472.

2014

D. Pitt, M. Woods, and M. Penner from the Canadian Forest Service, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and Forest Analysis Ltd., respectively for their paper as published in: D. Pitt, M. Woods, and M. Penner, 2014. A comparison of point clouds derived from stereo imagery and airborne laser scanning for the area-based estimation of forest inventory attributes in boreal Ontario. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 40 (3) pp. 214-232.

2013

J. Holmgren (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) and co-authors for “your well written paper presenting interesting methods on tree crown segmentation which was very well received by the international community”, as published in: J.Holmgren and E. Lindberg, 2013. Tree crown segmentation based on a geometric tree crown model for prediction of forest variables. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 39 (S1) pp. S86-S98.

2012

A.P. Trishchenko (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, ON) and co-authors for “a discussion of issues associated with the development of a satellite system with a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) for Arctic observation”, as published in: A.P. Trishchenko and L. Garand, 2012. Observing polar regions from space: Advantages of a satellite system on a highly elliptical orbit versus a constellation of low earth polar orbiters. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 38(1) pp.12-24.

2011

A.M. Smith (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB) and co-authors for “an important contribution to RADARSAT-2 image analysis of native grasslands in western Canada”, as published in: A.M. Smith and J.R. Buckley, 2011. Investigating RADARSAT-2 as a tool for monitoring grassland in western Canada. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 37(1), pp. 93-102.

2010

A.I. Calderhead (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology) and co-authors, for the application of differential interferometry “to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images (D-InSAR) of the Toluca Valley, Mexico, with the aim of measuring and monitoring land subsidence” as published in: A.I. Calderhead, R. Martel, P.-J. Alasset, A. Rivera, and J. Garfias, 2010. Land subsidence induced by groundwater pumping, monitored by D-InSAR and field data in the Toluca Valley, Mexico. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 36 (1), pp. 9-23

2009

J. Whitcomb (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI) and co-authors, for the development of a wetland mapping tool integrating JERS-1 imagery for “improved characterization of land-atmosphere CH4 and CO2 fluxes and climatic change impacts associated with thawing soils and changes in the extent and drying of wetland ecosystems” as published in; J.Whitcomb, M. Moghaddam, K.McDonald, J. Kellndorfer, and E. Podest, 2009. Mapping vegetated wetlands of Alaska using L-band radar satellite imagery. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 35 (1), pp. 54-72

2008

M.A. Wulder (Pacific Forestry Centre, Victoria, BC) and co-authors, for “the design, development and implementation of a first-ever Landsat classification of the forested area of Canada“, as published in: M.A. Wulder, J. C. White, M. Cranny, R. J. Hall, J. E. Luther, A. Beaudoin, D. G. Goodenough, and J. A. Dechka, 2008. Monitoring Canada’s forests. Part 1: Completion of the EOSD land cover project. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 34 (6), pp. 549-562.

2007

J.C.B. Da Silva (Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal) and co-authors, for “a unique use of SAR imagery for ocean remote sensing”, as published in: J.C.B. Da Silva, A.L. New and A. Azevedo, 2007. On the role of SAR for observing “local generation” of internal solitary waves off the Iberian Peninsula. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 33 (5):388-403.

2006

D. Janzen (University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, B. C.) and co-authors, for “an innovative approach to forestry remote sensing image processing and analysis”, as published in: D. Janzen, R. Wheate and A. Fredeen, 2006. Radiometric correction techniques and accuracy assessment for Landsat TM data in remote forested regions, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 32(5): 330-340.

2005

N.H. Short (Noetix Research Inc., Ottawa) and co-authors, for “an important contribution to RADARSAT image analysis of glacier movement in northern Canada”, as published in: N.H. Short and A.L. Gray, 2005. Glacier Dynamics in the Canadian High Arctic from RADARSAT-1 Speckle Tracking. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 31(3):225-239.

2002

A.L. Gray (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa) and co-authors, for “a critical assessment of the application of SAR interferometry as an original quantitative SAR interpretation technique to an important and generalised problem” as published in: A.L. Gray, N. Short, K. E. Mattar and K.C. Jezek. 2001. Velocities and flux of the Filchner Ice Shelf and its tributaries determined from speckle tracking interferometry, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 27(3): 193-206.

2001

S.T. Dokken (Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden) and co-authors, for a “significant contribution to the development and validation of sea ice remote sensing applications” as published in: Dokken, S.T., B. Håkansson and J. Askne, 2000. Inter-Comparison of Arctic Sea Ice Concentration using RADARSAT, ERS, SSM/I and In-Situ Data, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, 26(6): 521-536

National Best Ph.D. Thesis

2020

Dr. Lingfei Ma, “Road Information Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds using Deep Neural Networks“. University of Waterloo (Dr. Jonathan Li, University of Waterloo and Dr. Michael A. Chapman, Ryerson University, Co-supervisors)

2019 (ex aequo)

  • Dr. Tristan Goodbody, “Assessing the role of digital aerial photogrammetry for characterizing forest structure and enhancing forest inventories“. University of British Columbia (Supervisor Dr. Nicholas C. Coops)
  • Dr. Zhouxin Xi ” Fine-scale Inventory of Forest Biomass with Ground-based LiDAR“. University of Lethbridge (Supervisor Dr. Chris Hopkinson)

2018

Fanny Larue “Développement d’un système d’assimilation de mesures satellites micro-ondes passives dans un modèle de neige pour la prévision hydrologique au Québec”. Université de Sherbrooke (Co-director: Prof. Alain Royer, Université de Sherbrooke & Dr. Danielle de Sève, IREQ)

2017

David Laskin “Remote sensing of understory plant phenology: a framework for monitoring and projecting the impacts of climate change”, University of Calgary (G. McDermid, Supervisor)

2016

Douglas Bolton “Characterizing the Link between Fire History, Productivity, and Forest Structure Across Canada’s Northern Boreal Using Multi-Source Remote Sensing”, University of British Columbia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2015 (ex aequo) –

  • Serge Olivier Kotchi “Estimation et évaluation d’incertitude d’indicateurs agrométéorologiques par télédétection en vue de supporter la lutte phytosanitaire”, Université Laval (Nathalie Barrette, Supervisor)
  • Karin van Ewijk “Estimating Forest Structure from LIDAR and High Spatial Resolution Imagery for the Prediction of Succession and Species Composition”, Queen’s University, (Neal Scott and Paul Treitz, Supervisors)

2014

Alexandre Roy, “Modélisation de l’émission micro-onde hivernale en forêt boréale canadienne”, Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke (Alain Royer, Supervisor)

2013

Andrés Varhola, “The Use of Remote Sensing to Characterize Forest Structure and Improve the Modeling of Snow Processes in Extensively Disturbed Watersheds”, Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia. (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2012

Martin Béland, “Estimation de paramètres structuraux des arbres dans une savane à partir de mesures LiDAR terrestre et d’imagerie à très haute résolution spatiale”. Département de Géomatique Appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke. (Richard Fournier, Supervisor)

2011 (ex aequo)

  • Trevor Gareth Jones, “Employing Advanced Airborne Remotely Sensed Data to Improve Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping”. Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia. (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)
  • Gang Chen, “A GEOBIA Framework for Estimating Forest Biophysical Parameters: Integrating LiDAR Transects and Quickbird Data”. Department of Geography, University of Calgary. (Geoffrey Hay, Supervisor)

2010

Julia Linke, “Development and Application of a Framework for Flexible and Reliable Landscape Monitoring: Changes in the Alberta Foothills and the Impact on Grizzly Bear Habitat”. Department of Geography, University of Calgary (Greg McDermid, Supervisor).

2009

Inian Moorthy, “Tree Crown Structural Characterization: A Study Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and 3D Radiative Transfer Modeling”, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).

2008 (ex aequo)

  • Laura Chasmer, “Canopy Structural and Meteorological Influences on CO2 Exchange for MODIS Product Validation in a Boreal Jack Pine Chronosequence”, Department of Geography Queen University (Harry McCaughey and Paul Treitz, Supervisors)
  • Thomas Hilker, “Estimation of Photosynthetic Light-Use Efficiency from Automated Multi-Angular Spectroradiometer Measurements of Coastal Douglas-Fir” Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2007 –

Yongqin (Lisa) Zhang, “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Algorithms for Retrieving Forest Chlorophyll Content“, Department of Geography, University of Toronto (Jing Chen, Supervisor)

2006

Valerie A. Thomas, “Spatially Explicit Modelling of Forest Structure and Function using Airborne LiDAR and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Data Combined with Micrometeorological Measurements“, Department of Geography, Queen’s University (Paul Treitz and Harry McCaughey, Supervisors)

2005

Arnaud Mialon, “Étude de la variabilité climatique des hautes latitudes nord, dérivée d’observations satellites micro-ondes“, Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke (Alain Royer Université de Sherbrooke et Michel Fily, Université Josef Fourier, Grenoble France, Supervisors)

2002

Robin Qiaofeng Zhang, “Spatial, Spectral and Temporal Analysis of Urban Landscape Dynamics Using Optical Satellite Data”, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario (Jinfei Wang, Supervisor).

2001

Pablo J. Zarco-Tejada, “Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Closed Forest Canopies: Estimation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Pigment Content“, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).

2000

H. Peter White, “Investigations of Boreal Forest Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF)“, Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).

1997

Derek R. Peddle, “Remote Sensing of Boreal Forest Terrain: Sub-Pixel Modeling of Land Cover and Biophysical Parameters at Forest Stand and Regional Scales“, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Ellsworth LeDrew, Supervisor).

1992

Grant A. Bracher, “Detection of Nutrient Stress in Douglas-Fir Seedlings Using Spectroradiometer Data“, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia (Peter A. Murtha, Supervisor).

1989

Jinfei Wang, “A New Automated Linear-feature Network Detection and Analysis (LINDA) System and its applications”, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Phil Howarth, Supervisor).

National Best Master’s Thesis

2020

Agatha Czekajlo, “Characterizing multi-decadal vegetative greenness and land use dynamics across Canadian urban areas using satellite remote sensing”. University of British Columbia (Nicholas Coops & Matilda van den Bosch, Co-supervisors and Michael Wulder, Research Scientist, Canadian Forest Service, NRCan)

2019

Ethan Berman “Investigating grizzly bear responses to spring snow dynamics through the generation of fine spatial and temporal scale snow cover imagery in Alberta, Canada”.University of British Columbia (Supervisor Dr. Nicholas C. Coops)

2018

David McCaffrey “Assessing historic change in subalpine forest: a case study in the West Castle watershed”, University of Lethbridge (Supervisor: Prof. Chris Hopkinson)

2017

Mitchell Bonney, “Landscape Variability of Vegetation Change across the Forest to Tundra Transition of Central Canada”, Queen’s University (co-supervisor: Paul Treitz and Ryan Danby)

2016

Curtis Chance “Mapping the Distributions of Two Invasive Plant Species in Urban Areas with Advanced Remote Sensing Data”. University of British Columbia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2015

Charles Papasodoro “Utilisation de la stereo radargrammétrie RADARSAT-2 pour le suivi de la fonte des calottes glaciaires Barnes et Penny (île de Baffin)”. Université de Sherbrooke, (A. Royer and A. Langlois, Supervisors)

2014

Vanessa Mascorro, “Assessing Forest Disturbances for Carbon Modeling: Building the Bridge between Activity Data and Carbon Budget Modeling”. Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2013

Myriam Lemelin, “Télédétection de l’ilménite pour l’identification de régions propices à l’exploration minérale sur la Lune.” Département de géomatique appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke. (Kalifa Goïta, Michael Germain, and Caroline Emmanuelle Morisset, Supervisors)

2012

Christopher Czerwinski, “Forest Change Detection and Mapping in Gatineau Park, Québec 1987 To 2010 using Landsat Imagery”. Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University (Scott Mitchell and Doug King, Supervisors).

2011 (tie) –

Cheryl Rogers, “Remote Sensing of Light Use Efficiency in a Boreal Forest and Peatland in James Bay, Quebec”. Department of Natural Resources, McGill University. (Margaret Kalacska, Supervisor)

2011 (tie) –

Thomas Bergeron, “Estimation de la ressource éolienne en mer à l’aide du satellite RADARSAT-2”. Centre Eau Terre et Environment, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université du Québec. (Monique Bernier, Supervisor)

2010

Yuanming Shu, “Dark Spot Detection from SAR Intensity Imagery with Spatial Density Thresholding for Oil Spill Monitoring.” Department of Geography, University of Waterloo. (Jonathan Li, Supervisor)

2009

Thoreau Rory Tooke, “Remote Sensing Applications for Vegetation Management in Urban Environments”, Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2008

Christopher Bater “Assessing Indicators of Forest Sustainability using LiDAR Remote Sensing”, Department of Forest Resource Management, University of British Colombia (Nicholas Coops, Supervisor)

2007 (tie) –

Peter Eddy, “Development of Remote Sensing Techniques for the Implementation of Site Specific Herbicide Management “, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Anne Smith and Derek Peddle, Supervisors).

2007 (tie) –

David Alfred, “Semi-Automated Rooftop Identification from High Spatial and Spectral Resolution Spaceborne Remote Sensing Imagery“, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario (Jinfei Wang, Supervisor)

2006

Scott A. Soenen, “Remote Sensing of Montane Forest Structure and Biomass: A Canopy Reflectance Model Inversion Approach“, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).

2005

Jonathon Pasher, “Modelling and Mapping Potential Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia Citrina) Habitat Using Remote Sensing”, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University (Doug King and Kathryn Lindsay, Supervisors)

2004

Steven P. Oldford, “Predicting Slow Drying Fire Weather Index Fuel Moisture Codes with NOAA–AVHRR Images in Canada’s Northern Boreal Forests”, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, University of New Brunswick (Brigitte Leblon and David MacLean, Supervisors).

2003

Nicole J. Rabe, “Remote Sensing of Crop Biophysical Parameters for Site-Specific Agriculture”, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).

2002

Catherine M. Champagne, “Remote Sensing of Plant Water Content for Precision Agriculture: The Potential for Hyperspectral Modelling”, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa (Abdou Bannari and Karl Staenz, Supervisors).

2001

Alice Deschamps, “Characterization of Modern Reefs using the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA) Protocol and Digitized aerial photographs, Tobago Cays Marine Park, St. Vincent and the Grenadines“, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa (André Desrochers, Supervisor).

2000

Ryan L. Johnson, “Airborne Remote Sensing of Forest Leaf Area in Mountainous Terrain, Kananaskis Alberta“, Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge (Derek Peddle, Supervisor).

1999

Kris Innanen, “Approaches to the Direct Extraction of Forest Canopy Variables from High-Spatial Resolution Winter Reflectance Imagery“, Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, (John Miller, Supervisor).

1997

Mike Wulder, “Airborne Remote Sensing of Forest Structure: Estimation of Leaf Area Index“, Department of Geography, University of Waterloo (Ellsworth LeDrew, Supervisor).

1995

Ray Soffer, “Bidirectional Reflectance Factors of an Open Tree Canopy by Laboratory Simulation“, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).

1990

Richard Fournier, “3-Dimensional Modelling of Forest Canopies for High Resolution Imagery“, Department of Earth and Space Science, York University (John Miller, Supervisor).

1989

Joan E. Luther, “Terrain Classification using Landsat Thematic Mapper and Digital Topographic Data in the Burwash Uplands, Southwest Yukon“, Department of Geography, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Steven Franklin, Supervisor).

Best Student Presentations

2021 – 42nd CSRS – Virtual Event

Best Student Oral Presentations

1st place: Bastien Vandendaele (Université de Sherbrooke) for his oral presentation entitled “Investigating the Use of UAV Laser Scanning (ULS) to Derive Individual Tree Attributes in a Northern Hardwood Forest – A Step toward Better Supporting Uneven-aged Forest Management

2nd place: Gillian Rowan (McGill University) for her oral presentation entitled “Determining the spectral separability of freshwater submerged aquatic vegetation of the St. Lawrence River

3rd place: Jessica V. Fayne (University of California, Los Angeles) for her oral presentation entitled “The Quantification of Near-Nadir Ka-band Surface Scattering Characteristics

2020 – 41st CSRS – 1st Virtual Event

Best Student Oral Presentations

1st place: Hamdy Elsayed (Ryerson University) for his oral presentation entitled “State-of-the-Art in LiDAR Scanning Technology, Design Approaches and Analysis of MEMS and TOF Camera-based Mapping Systems” (co-authors: Dr Ahmed Shaker, Taiwo Amida)

2nd place (ex aequo):

  • Celeste Barnes (University of Lethbridge) for her oral presentation entitled “Airborne LiDAR Flight Path Sampling Optimization for Watershed-wide Snowpack Depth Monitoring” (co-author: Dr. Christopher Hopkinson)
  • Emily Jones (University of Lethbridge) for her oral presentation entitled “Wildfire Return Intervals: Understanding Impacts of Climate Mediated Shortening of Fire Intervals in Boreal Peatlands using Multi-Spectral Lidar” (co-authors: Dr. Laura Chasmer, Dr. Christopher Hopkinson, Dr. Kevin Devito, Prof Stewart Rood)

3rd place: Ethan D.Kyzivat (Brown University) for his oral presentation entitled “Boreal Wetland Mapping by Airborne SAR to Upscale Greenhouse Gas Emissions” (co-authors: Dr. Laurence C. Smith, Jessica Fayne, Dr. David Butman, Dr. Tamlin Pavelsky)

Best Student Poster Presentations

1st place: Jeffrey Harder (University of Saskatchewan) for his poster entitled “Learning From The Past: Analyzing Historical Large Wildfires to Predict Future Occurrences in Saskatchewan’s Boreal Forest

2nd place ex aequo:

  • Ebraheem Alhomodi (Ryerson University) for his poster entitled “On the Potential Use of LiDAR Data for Crack Detection: A Case study in Downtown Toronto”. (co-authors: Prof. Ahmed Shaker, Prof. Ahmed El-Rabbany)
  • Hwang Lee (Western University) for his poster entitled “Using Linear Regression, Random Forests and Support Vector Machine to Predict Canopy Nitrogen Weight in Corn Fields from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Multispectral Images”. (co-authors: Prof. Jinfei Wang, Prof. Brigitte Leblon)

3rd place: Sarah martins (INRS) for her poster entitled “Using Drone hyperspectral Data to Remotely Retrieve Dissolved Organic Carbon Data from Canada’s Inland Waterbodies”. (co-authors: Dr. Anas El Alem, Prof. Scott Smith, Prof. James McGeer, Prof Karem Chokmani, Prof. Peter Campbell, Prof Jeffrey Cardille, Prof Mickey Nielsen)

2019 – 40th CSRS & Geomatics Atlantic 2019: Fredericton, New Brunswick

Best Student Oral Presentations

1st place: Meyra Fuentes (Environment and Climate Change Canada) for her oral presentation entitled “Big geospatial data analysis for the air pollutant emissions inventory (APEI) using Google Earth Engine to estimate particulate matter from mines” (co-authors: Koreen Millard, Emil Laurin)

2nd place: Zhouxin Xi (University of Lethbridge) for his oral presentation entitled “Decomposing plot-level terrestrial laser scanning point clouds into wood components for biomass estimation based on deep 3-D fully convolutional networks and quantitative structural modeling” (co-authors: Dr. Christopher Hopkinson, Dr. Laura Chasmer, Stewart Rood)

3rd place: Won Mo jung (York University) for his oral presentation entitled “Automatic road crack detection and localization with identification of pavement distress levels using LiDAR ranges”. (co-author: Faizaan Naveed)

Best Student Poster Presentations

1st place: Keerthijan Radhakrishnan (University of Waterloo) for his poster entitled “Automated whale detection from airborne optical imagery of the Eastern Canadian Arctic”. (co-authors: Peter Q. Lee, Vignesh Sankar, Linlin Xu, Andrea Scott, David A. Clausi, Marianne Marcoux)

2nd place: Pierre Migolet (Université de Sherbrooke) for his poster entitled “Estimation de la biomasse aérienne des palmiers à huile dans le Bassin du Congo en utilisant la transformée de Fourier basée sur l’ordination texturale de l’image FORMOSAT 2». (co-author: Kalifa Goita)

3rd place: Xavier Gallagher-Duval (Université de Sherbrooke) for his poster entitled “Predicting stem diameter distribution (SDD) using airborne LiDAR metrics for western Newfoundland forests”. (co-authors: Dr Richard Fournier, Olivier R. Van Lier, Dr. Joan Luther)

2018 – 39th CSRS: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Best Oral Presentations:

1st place: Dale Gross (University of Saskatchewan) for his oral presentation entitled “Using remote sensing to evaluate risk of wildfire in grassland types relative to patterns of grazing animals, soil types, precipitation data, and NDVI of vegetation during years of precipitation extremes in southwest Saskatchewan”. (co-authors: Hannah Hilger, Dr. Eric Lamb)

2nd place: David McCaffrey (University of Lethbridge) for his oral presentation entitled “Replicating a Random Forest Model of Alpine Treeline Ecotone Dynamics” (co-author:Dr. Christopher Hopkinson)

3rd place: Man Fai Wu (University of Calgary) for his oral presentation entitled “Airborne Remote Sensing Technologies for Coniferous Stocking Assessment on Boreal Seismic Lines”. (co-authors: Prof. Greg Mcdermid, Dr. Julia Linke, Dr. Mir Mustafizur Rahman)

Best Poster Presentations:

1st place: Faizaan Naveed (York University) for his poster entitled “Individual Tree Crown Delineation Using Airborne LiDAR Data and Worldview 3 Imagery” (co-author: Prof. Baoxin Hu)

2nd place: Ambika Paudel (Carleton University) for her poster entitled “Assessing the interaction of vegetation and hydrology in forested wetlands using remote sensing data and field measurements” . (co-authros: Dr. Murray Richardson, Dr. Doug King)

3rd place: Silvie Cafarella (University of Victoria) for her poster entitled “Relationships between airborne-derived sea ice surface roughness and C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter”. (co-author: Dr. Randy Scharien)

2017 – 38th CSRS: Montreal, Quebec

Joshua Montgomery (Department of Geography, U. Lethbridge) “A Synthetic Aperture Radar, Optical and LiDAR, Data Fusion Approach to Wetland Classification in a Boreal Environment of the Utikuma Regional Study Area, Alberta, Canada” (co-authors: Dr. Chris Hopkinson, Dr. Laura Chasmer, Dr. Brian Brisco (CCRS)). (Best Student Oral Presentation)

Jingyi Liu (Queen’s University) “A Combined Method for Vegetation Classification Based on Visible Bands from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Images: A Case Study for Wild Parsnip Plants” (co-author: Prof. Dongmei Chen). (Best Student Poster Presentation – (tie))

Claudie Ratté-Fortin (INRS-ÉTÉ) “Modeling Spatio-Temporal Variation of Algal Bloom Using MODIS Inland Waters Data Processing” (co-authors: Prof. Karem Chokmani, Mr. Anas El Alem). (Best Student Poster Presentation – (tie))

Justin Murfitt (University of Toronto Mississauga) “Using RADARSAT-2 to Identify Ice Growth and Decay in Central Ontario: 2008-2016” (co-author: Dr. Laura Brown). (Best Student Poster Presentation – (tie))

2016 – 37th CSRS: Winnipeg, Manitoba

Jason Beaver (Department of Geography, U. Lethbridge) “BRDF Effects on Vegetation Indexes and Resultant LAI Derivations in Agricultural Crops” (Best Student Oral Presentation)

Salem Morsy (Department of Civil Engineering, Ryerson U.) “Automatic Land-Water Delineation from Multispectral Airborne LIDAR Data Using Normalized Difference Water Indexes” (Best Student Poster Presentation)

2015 – 36th CSRS: St-John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Taejin Park (Boston University) “Satellite Observed Sunlight-Mediated Seasonality in Greenness of Wet Equatorial Amazonian Rainforest”. (Best Student Oral Presentation)

Sungho Choi (Boston University) “Large-Scale Modeling of Forest Height and Biomass using the Metabolic Scaling Theory and Water-Energy Balance Equation”. (Best Student Poster Presentation)

2013 – 34th CSRS: Victoria, British Columbia

Ryan Powers (University of British Columbia). “Evaluating Boreal Reserve Design Using a Long Time-Series Dynamic Habitat Index”. (Best Student Oral Presentation).

Tyson Carswell (University of Victoria). “Satellite Imagery to Determine Spring Phytoplankton Bloom Dynamics for Fisheries Management in the Strait of Georgia, Canada”. (Best Student Poster Presentation)

2012 – 33rd CSRS: Ottawa, Ontario

Chuiqing Zeng (University of Western Ontario). “An Object Matching Method for Stereo Satellite Imagery for Building Height Extraction.” (Best Student Oral Presentation).

Myriam Lemelin (Université de Sherbrooke). “Ilmenite Detection on the Moon by Remote Sensing: An Integration of Multisensor Datasets over Mare Australe and Mare Ingenii Regions.” (Best Student Poster Presentation)

2011 – 32nd CSRS: Sherbrooke, Québec

J.-B. Leguet (Université de Montréal). “Lake Carbon Estimation by Satellite in Quebec: Comparative Case Studies in the Abitibi and Eastmain Regions.” (Best Student Oral Presentation).

Sarah Banks (Carleton University). “Assessing Radarsat-2 Polarimetric SAR for Mapping Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT) Classes in the Canadian Arctic”. (Best Student Poster Presentation – (tie)).

Dennis C. Duro (University of Saskatchewan). “Multi-Source, Multi-Resolution, Object Based Image Analysis of Earth Observation Imagery Using Random Forests” (Best Student Poster Presentation – (tie)).

2010 – 31st CSRS: Regina, Saskatchewan

Karen van Ewijk (Queen’s University). “Characterizing Central Ontario’s Forest Ecosystems by Fusing Airborne LiDAR and High Resolution Digital Imagery.” (Best Student Oral Presentation)

Valerie Torontow (Carleton University). “Multivariate Forest Structure Modeling and Mapping Using Quickbird Imagery and Topographic Data in Chelsea, Quebec.” (Best Student Poster Presentation)

2009 – 30th CSRS: Lethbridge, Alberta. $500.00

Ben Kuttner (University of Toronto) and Jay Malcolm (University of Toronto). “The Application of ALS LiDAR Data to Differentiate Among Three Classes of Increasing Structural Complexity in Boreal Spruce and Mixedwood Forest Types”. (Best Student Oral Presentation: $250)

V. Sherkashyn (Université de Sherbrooke), D.C. He (Université de Sherbrooke) and R. Kountchev (Technical University-Sofia, Bulgaria). “Implementation of a New Adaptive Image Representation Approach (AIPR-BPNN) for Compression of IKONOS Images”. (Best Student Poster Presentation: $250)

2008 – 29th CSRS: Whitehorse, Yukon. $500.00

Martha K. Raynolds (University of Alaska). “The Effect of Landscape Age on Circumpolar Distribution of Artic Vegetation”. (Best Student Oral Presentation (tie): $150.00)

Thoreau R. Tooke (University of British Columbia). “A Ground-Based Classification Scheme for Interpreting Satellite Derived Urban Vegetation Characteristics”. (Best Student Oral Presentation (tie): $150.00)

Claude Codja (Université du Québec à Montréal). “Méthode empirique de correction des effets cardinaux sur les images RADARSAT-1 portant sur le milieu urbain”. (Best Student Poster Presentation (tie): $100.00)

Erin D. Trochim (University of Alaska). “Examining the Relationships Between Themokarst and Headwater Drainage Network Using Remote Sensing in the Upper Kupuruk Basin”. (Best Student Poster Presentation (tie): $100.00)

2007 – 28th CSRS: Ottawa. Award sponsored by PCI Geomatics: $500.00

François Vachon (Université de Sherbrooke), K. Goïta (Univ. de Sherbrooke), D. De Sève (IREQ), A. Royer (Univ. de Sherbrooke), “Snow Water Equivalent Retrieval in a Sub-Arctic Environment of The North of Quebec from Space-Borne Passive Microwave Observations”: (Best Student Oral Presentation (tie): $200.00)

Peter R. Eddy (University of Lethbridge), A.M. Smith (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada [AAFC] and Univ. Lethbridge), B.D. Hill (AAFC), D.R. Peddle (Univ. Lethbridge), C.A. Coburn (Univ. Lethbridge) and R.E. Blackshaw (AAFC). “Improved Site-Specific Herbicide Management Using Artificial Neural Networks and Hyperspectral Image Data”. (Best Student Oral Presentation (tie): $200.00)

Maria Dissanska (INRS-ETE), M. Bernier (INRS-ETE), S. Payette (Univ. Laval) “Study of Peatlands Aqualyse in the Area of the Hydroelectrical Complex Lagrande using Very High Resolution Satellite Panchromatic Images”. (Best Student Poster Presentation: $100.00)

CRSS Student Symposium Travel Grants

2019

Kailyn Nelson, University of Lethbridge
Linda Flad, University of Lethbridge
Mohsen Ghanbari, Unversity of Waterloo

2018

Md Saifuzzaman, McGill University
Sasha Nasonova, University of Victoria
Deep Inamdar, McGill University

2017

Aliny Aparecida Dos Reis, Trent University
Christopher Ilori, Simon Fraser University
Bing Lu, University of Toronto Mississauga

2016

Salem Morsy, Ryerson University

2015

Justin Byatt, University of New Brunswick
Justin Murfitt, University of Toronto Mississauga
Joyce Arabian, University of Toronto

2014

Medhi Aminipouri, Simon Fraser University
Derrick Ho, Simon Fraser University

2019 Recipients

Left to right:
– David McCaffrey, University of Lethbridge, 2018 Best M.Sc. Thesis
– Dr. Bahram Salehi, SUNY College of Environmental Resources Engineering, Bronze Medal
– Dr. Monique Bernier, INRS, CJRS Editor in Chief 2018 to Present, Larry Morley Gold Medal
– Dr. Gary Borstad, ASL Environmental Sciences, Val Shaw Memorial Award
– Prof. Dr. Joseph Piwowar, University of Regina, CRSS-SCT Treasurer 2010 to 2019, Outstanding Service Award