About

What We Do

The CRSS is a fully independent, not-for-profit professional society that provides a focal point for leadership and excellence to advance the remote sensing field. We maintain partnerships with other organizations in the remote sensing field, across Canada and abroad. Our annual Symposium and the Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing provide opportunities for our members to network and continue their learning about all aspects of remote sensing. We also recognize excellence among our members through our National Awards.

History of the CRSS

The genesis of remote sensing activities that led to the formation of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society (CRSS) began in the 1960s. These activities encompassed government, industry, and educational institutions.

The Federal Government Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) was created in 1971 with Dr. Larry W. Morley as its founder and first Director General. Under Dr. Morley’s leadership, the first Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing was held in February 1972 in Ottawa. CCRS has played a very active role in many aspects of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society ever since. In 2011, the Canadian Remote Sensing Society organized special presentations to celebrate the 40th anniversary of CCRS at the 32nd Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing/14ième Congrès de l’AQT held in Sherbrooke Québec.

The CRSS was formed as an independent Society at the second Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing held April 1974 in Guelph, Ontario. Dr. Morley was the first President of CRSS. In 1975, CRSS joined with the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute (CASI) as a constituent society, a partnership that continued until November 2012, when CRSS separated from CASI. CRSS has now returned to its original status and is incorporated as a fully independent, not-for-profit professional society.

The first Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the new independent CRSS was held on August 28, 2013 at the 34th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing in Victoria, BC. At this AGM, a proposed new structure was presented to promote further involvement of society members, as well as announcements of important new activities and opportunities. As the Society looks ahead to these new initiatives, CRSS will also continue to build on past traditions and activities such as the CRSS National Awards Program, the Canadian Remote Sensing Symposium Series, and the Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing.

Dr. Morley was recognised for his leadership and support of both CCRS and CRSS at the 33rd Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing held in Ottawa June 2012. With the passing of Dr. Morley in April 2013, his legacy was remembered at the 34th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing August 2013 in Victoria BC through several presentations, a Memorial Lecture, and also through the CRSS Gold Medal Award being officially renamed the “CRSS Larry Morley Gold Medal Award”. This Award is the highest honour in remote sensing in the country granted by the Canadian Remote Sensing Society. Dr. Morley was its first recipient, in 1986. His legacy of leadership and support of remote sensing lives on at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing and with the Canadian Remote Sensing Society.

The CRSS Logo

In 2016, CRSS undertook a rebranding project, to refresh our organization’s logo and web presence, and to better portray the evolution of the remote sensing field.

Our old crest included remote sensing platforms — an aircraft and satellite — but we wanted the new logo to be more active and engaging, to represent the activity of remote sensing, including aspects of spectrum, radar, passive and active sensing, backscatter, and emissivity, all within the Canadian context.

The elements of our new logo are as follows:

  • The three crescent moon shapes convey ‘pulses’ of electromagnetic radiation, while the three white arcs represent the backscatter from the pulses.
  • The three colours represent soil, vegetation and water.
  • The maple leaf, of course, reflects our cross-Canada membership.